Wednesday, January 11, 2017

                NEW  WHITE  HOUSE  SCIENCE  EXORCIST  
                          WARNS  OF  WITCHCRAFT  DENIAL




Copper Infused Square Frying Pan Channel Host Climate Depot 

publisher Marc Morano, late of Senator Inhofe's staff, explains

                           YES,  FEARLESS  LEADER  WRITER

REACTING TO THE BUZZFEED MELTDOWN, BREITBART
    HAS ANGRILY  DENIED  REPORTS OF  ITS  FACT CHECKERS  
FINDING  ONE  IN A  DELINGPOLE COLUMN
Too bad Delingpole has been too busy crushing ocean acidification loons to actually talk to an oceanographer ! 

Monday, January 9, 2017

A FEW PARTING  WORDS  FROM  THE  TROGLODYTE IN CHIEF

ANOTHER  NON-PARTISAN  OP-ED  FROM  THE  AAAS:


The irreversible momentum of clean energy

The release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) due to human activity is increasing global average surface air temperatures, disrupting weather patterns, and acidifying the ocean (1). Left unchecked, the continued growth of GHG emissions could cause global average temperatures to increase by another 4°C or more by 2100 and by 1.5 to 2 times as much in many midcontinent and far northern locations (1). Although our understanding of the impacts of climate change is increasingly and disturbingly clear,  there is still debate about the proper course for U.S. policy—a debate that is very much on display during the current presidential transition.  But putting near-term politics aside, the mounting economic and scientific evidence leave me confident that trends toward a clean-energy economy that have emerged during my presidency will continue and that the economic opportunity for our country to harness that trend will only grow. This Policy Forum will focus on the four reasons I believe the trend toward clean energy is irreversible.

ECONOMIES GROW, EMISSIONS FALL

The United States is showing that GHG mitigation need not conflict with economic growth. Rather, it can boost efficiency, productivity, and innovation.
Since 2008, the United States has experienced the first sustained period of rapid GHG emissions reductions and simultaneous economic growth on record. Specifically, CO2 emissions from the energy sector fell by 9.5% from 2008 to 2015, while the economy grew by more than 10%. In this same period, the amount of energy consumed per dollar of real gross domestic product (GDP) fell by almost 11%, the amount of CO2 emitted per unit of energy consumed declined by 8%, and CO2 emitted per dollar of GDP declined by 18% (2).
The importance of this trend cannot be understated. This “decoupling” of energy sector emissions and economic growth should put to rest the argument that combatting climate change requires accepting lower growth or a lower standard of living. In fact, although this decoupling is most pronounced in the United States, evidence that economies can grow while emissions do not is emerging around the world. The International Energy Agency’s (IEA’s) preliminary estimate of energy-related CO2 emissions in 2015 reveals that emissions stayed flat compared with the year before, whereas the global economy grew (3). The IEA noted that “There have been only four periods in the past 40 years in which CO2 emission levels were flat or fell compared with the previous year, with three of those—the early 1980s, 1992, and 2009—being associated with global economic weakness. By contrast, the recent halt in emissions growth comes in a period of economic growth.”
At the same time, evidence is mounting that any economic strategy that ignores carbon pollution will impose tremendous costs to the global economy and will result in fewer jobs and less economic growth over the long term. Estimates of the economic damages from warming of 4°C over preindustrial levels range from 1% to 5% of global GDP each year by 2100 (4). One of the most frequently cited economic models pins the estimate of annual damages from warming of 4°C at ~4% of global GDP (46), which could lead to lost U.S. federal revenue of roughly $340 billion to $690 billion annually (7).
Moreover, these estimates do not include the possibility of GHG increases triggering catastrophic events, such as the accelerated shrinkage of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, drastic changes in ocean currents, or sizable releases of GHGs from previously frozen soils and sediments that rapidly accelerate warming. In addition, these estimates factor in economic damages but do not address the critical question of whether the underlying rate of economic growth (rather than just the level of GDP) is affected by climate change, so these studies could substantially understate the potential damage of climate change on the global macroeconomy (89).
As a result, it is becoming increasingly clear that, regardless of the inherent uncertainties in predicting future climate and weather patterns, the investments needed to reduce emissions—and to increase resilience and preparedness for the changes in climate that can no longer be avoided—will be modest in comparison with the benefits from avoided climate-change damages. This means, in the coming years, states, localities, and businesses will need to continue making these critical investments, in addition to taking common-sense steps to disclose climate risk to taxpayers, homeowners, shareholders, and customers. Global insurance and reinsurance businesses are already taking such steps as their analytical models reveal growing climate risk.

PRIVATE-SECTOR EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

Beyond the macroeconomic case, businesses are coming to the conclusion that reducing emissions is not just good for the environment—it can also boost bottom lines, cut costs for consumers, and deliver returns for shareholders.
Perhaps the most compelling example is energy efficiency. Government has played a role in encouraging this kind of investment and innovation: My Administration has put in place (i) fuel economy standards that are net beneficial and are projected to cut more than 8 billion tons of carbon pollution over the lifetime of new vehicles sold between 2012 and 2029 (10) and (ii) 44 appliance standards and new building codes that are projected to cut 2.4 billion tons of carbon pollution and save $550 billion for consumers by 2030 (11).
But ultimately, these investments are being made by firms that decide to cut their energy waste in order to save money and invest in other areas of their businesses. For example, Alcoa has set a goal of reducing its GHG intensity 30% by 2020 from its 2005 baseline, and General Motors is working to reduce its energy intensity from facilities by 20% from its 2011 baseline over the same timeframe (12). Investments like these are contributing to what we are seeing take place across the economy: Total energy consumption in 2015 was 2.5% lower than it was in 2008, whereas the economy was 10% larger (2).
This kind of corporate decision-making can save money, but it also has the potential to create jobs that pay well. A U.S. Department of Energy report released this week found that ~2.2 million Americans are currently employed in the design, installation, and manufacture of energy-efficiency products and services. This compares with the roughly 1.1 million Americans who are employed in the production of fossil fuels and their use for electric power generation (13). Policies that continue to encourage businesses to save money by cutting energy waste could pay a major employment dividend and are based on stronger economic logic than continuing the nearly $5 billion per year in federal fossil-fuel subsidies, a market distortion that should be corrected on its own or in the context of corporate tax reform (14).

MARKET FORCES IN THE POWER SECTOR

The American electric-power sector—the largest source of GHG emissions in our economy—is being transformed, in large part, because of market dynamics. In 2008, natural gas made up ~21% of U.S. electricity generation. Today, it makes up ~33%, an increase due almost entirely to the shift from higher-emitting coal to lower-emitting natural gas, brought about primarily by the increased availability of low-cost gas due to new production techniques (215). Because the cost of new electricity generation using natural gas is projected to remain low relative to coal, it is unlikely that utilities will change course and choose to build coal-fired power plants, which would be more expensive than natural gas plants, regardless of any near-term changes in federal policy. Although methane emissions from natural gas production are a serious concern, firms have an economic incentive over the long term to put in place waste-reducing measures consistent with standards my Administration has put in place, and states will continue making important progress toward addressing this issue, irrespective of near-term federal policy.
Renewable electricity costs also fell dramatically between 2008 and 2015: the cost of electricity fell 41% for wind, 54% for rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) installations, and 64% for utility-scale PV (16). According to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, 2015 was a record year for clean-energy investment, with those energy sources attracting twice as much global capital as fossil fuels (17).
Public policy—ranging from Recovery Act investments to recent tax credit extensions—has played a crucial role, but technology advances and market forces will continue to drive renewable deployment. The levelized cost of electricity from new renewables like wind and solar in some parts of the United States is already lower than that for new coal generation, without counting subsidies for renewables (2).
That is why American businesses are making the move toward renewable energy sources. Google, for example, announced last month that, in 2017, it plans to power 100% of its operations using renewable energy—in large part through large-scale, long-term contracts to buy renewable energy directly (18). Walmart, the nation’s largest retailer, has set a goal of getting 100% of its energy from renewables in the coming years (19). And economy-wide, solar and wind firms now employ more than 360,000 Americans, compared with around 160,000 Americans who work in coal electric generation and support (13).
Beyond market forces, state-level policy will continue to drive clean-energy momentum. States representing 40% of the U.S. population are continuing to move ahead with clean-energy plans, and even outside of those states, clean energy is expanding. For example, wind power alone made up 12% of Texas’s electricity production in 2015 and, at certain points in 2015, that number was >40%, and wind provided 32% of Iowa’s total electricity generation in 2015, up from 8% in 2008 (a higher fraction than in any other state) (1520).

GLOBAL MOMENTUM

Outside the United States, countries and their businesses are moving forward, seeking to reap benefits for their countries by being at the front of the clean-energy race. This has not always been the case. A short time ago, many believed that only a small number of advanced economies should be responsible for reducing GHG emissions and contributing to the fight against climate change. But nations agreed in Paris that all countries should put forward increasingly ambitious climate policies and be subject to consistent transparency and accountability requirements. This was a fundamental shift in the diplomatic landscape, which has already yielded substantial dividends. The Paris Agreement entered into force in less than a year, and, at the follow-up meeting this fall in Marrakesh, countries agreed that, with more than 110 countries representing more than 75% of global emissions having already joined the Paris Agreement, climate action “momentum is irreversible” (21).
Although substantive action over decades will be required to realize the vision of Paris, analysis of countries’ individual contributions suggests that meeting medium-term respective targets and increasing their ambition in the years ahead—coupled with scaled-up investment in clean-energy technologies—could increase the international community’s probability of limiting warming to 2°C by as much as 50% (22).
Were the United States to step away from Paris, it would lose its seat at the table to hold other countries to their commitments, demand transparency, and encourage ambition. This does not mean the next Administration needs to follow identical domestic policies to my Administration’s. There are multiple paths and mechanisms by which this country can achieve—efficiently and economically—the targets we embraced in the Paris Agreement. The Paris Agreement itself is based on a nationally determined structure whereby each country sets and updates its own commitments. Regardless of U.S. domestic policies, it would undermine our economic interests to walk away from the opportunity to hold countries representing two-thirds of global emissions—including China, India, Mexico, European Union members, and others—accountable.
This should not be a partisan issue. It is good business and good economics to lead a technological revolution and define market trends. And it is smart planning to set long-term emission-reduction targets and give American companies, entrepreneurs, and investors certainty so they can invest and manufacture the emission-reducing technologies that we can use domestically and export to the rest of the world. That is why hundreds of major companies—including energy-related companies from ExxonMobil and Shell, to DuPont and Rio Tinto, to Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Calpine, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company—have supported the Paris process, and leading investors have committed $1 billion in patient, private capital to support clean-energy breakthroughs that could make even greater climate ambition possible.

CONCLUSION

We have long known, on the basis of a massive scientific record, that the urgency of acting to mitigate climate change is real and cannot be ignored. In recent years, we have also seen that the economic case for action—and against inaction—is just as clear, the business case for clean energy is growing, and the trend toward a cleaner power sector can be sustained regardless of near-term federal policies.
Despite the policy uncertainty that we face, I remain convinced that no country is better suited to confront the climate challenge and reap the economic benefits of a low-carbon future than the United States and that continued participation in the Paris process will yield great benefit for the American people, as well as the international community. Prudent U.S. policy over the next several decades would prioritize, among other actions, decarbonizing the U.S. energy system, storing carbon and reducing emissions within U.S. lands, and reducing non-CO2 emissions (23).
Of course, one of the great advantages of our system of government is that each president is able to chart his or her own policy course. And President-elect Donald Trump will have the opportunity to do so. The latest science and economics provide a helpful guide for what the future may bring, in many cases independent of near-term policy choices, when it comes to combatting climate change and transitioning to a clean-energy economy.

References and Notes

  1. The result for 4°C of warming cited here from DICE-2016R (in which this degree of warming is reached between 2095 and 2100 without further mitigation) is consistent with that reported from the DICE-2013R model in (5), Fig. 22, p. 140.

Friday, January 6, 2017

    NOW  IS  THE TIME  FOR  ALL GOOD MEN  TO  COME  TO ...


The Huffpost &  Salon  having  declared  victory in the Climate Wars, it's time for their non-partisan readers to claim the spoils- the Lincoln Network reports the White House and Cabinet have several hundred  science and technology  positions to fill.
11 appointees require Senate confirmation, but most are up to President Trump, and even he can't fire them til he hires them:
Legend:
Type of Appointment:                                                       Pay Plan: 
PAS = Presidential  w. Senate Confirmation                       AD = Administratively Determined
PA = Presidential  without Senate Confirmatio)               ES = Senior Executive Service
CA = Career Appointment                                               EX = Executive Schedule
NA = Noncareer Appointment                                         FA = Foreign Service Chiefs of Mission
EA = Limited Emergency Appointment                               FE = Senior Foreign Service
TA = Limited Term Appointment                                       FP = Foreign Service Specialist
SC = Schedule C Excepted Appointment                       GS = General Schedule
XS = Appointment Excepted by Statute                               PD = Daily Pay Rate* (per diem)
                                                                                      SL = Senior Level
  Position totals: 165                                                        TM = Federal Housing Finance Board                                                                                


Executive Office of the President: 
Office of E-Government and Information
Administrator DC PA EX
Deputy Adminstrator DC CA ES
Chief Architect DC CA ES
Confidential Assistant DC SC GS
Executive Office of the President: 
Office of Science and Technology Policy
Director DC PAS EX
Chief of Staff DC NA ES
Deputy Chief of staff and Assistant Director DC CA ES
Assistant to the President for Science and Technology DC PAS EX
Deputy Director of Policy DC NA ES
Assistant to the President and Chief Technology Officer DC PAS EX
Associate Director, Technology DC PAS EX
Assistant Director Legislative Affairs DC SC GS
Confidential Assistant DC SC GS
Executive Assistant DC SC GS
Confidential Assistant DC SC GS

Office of the Chief Information Officer
Associate Chief information officer, information technology services DC CA ES
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Deputy Chief for Science and Technology DC CA ES
Bureau of Industry and Security
Director, Office of National Security and Technology Transfrer Controls DC --ES
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards &Technology Gaithersburg, MD PAS EX
Office of the Secretary of Defense
Director of Defense Technology Security Administration DC CA ES
Foreign Relations Defense Poliyc Manager (Deputy Director, Defense Technology Security Administration). DC CA ES
Foreign Relations Defense Policy Manager (Principal Director, Cyber Policy) DC CA ES
Special Assistant for Acquisition Technology and logistics DC SC GS
Office of Director of Administration and Management
Director, Enterprise Information Technology Services Directorate DC CA ES
Office of General Counsel
Principal Director to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Information Management, Integration and Technology) DC CA ES
Director, Planning, Policy and Integration Information Technology Management DC CA ES
Director, Information Technology Investment DC CA ES
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics) ES
Director, Installations and Environment Science and Technology DC -- ES
Director, Counter-Terrorism Technology DC CA ES
Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics). DC NA ES
Special Assistant for Science and Technology Communities of Interest DC CA ES
Special Assistant to the Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics DC SC GS
SOD: Defense Finance and Accounting Service
Director, Information and Technology DC CA ES
SOD: Office of the Deputy Chief Management Officer
Director, Technology, Innovation and Engineering DC CA ES
SOD: Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology)
Assistant Secretary of the Army DC PAS EX
Special Assistant DC SC GS
SOD: Office of the Assistant Secretary of Navy
Director, Technology Security and Cooperative Programs Directorate. DC CA ES
Department of Education
Director, Educational Technology DC NA ES
DOE: Office of the Chief Financial Officer
Director, Information Technology Services DC CA ES
Director, Information Technology and Program Services. DC CA ES
Department of Energy: Office of Defense Nuclear Non Proliferation
Chief Science and Technology Officer DC CA ES
DOE: Office of Science
Director Office of Scientific and Technology Information DC CA ES
DOE: Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Program Manager, Office of Solar Energy Technology DC -- ES
Program Manager Office of Building Technologies Program DC -- ES
Deputy assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Dc CA ES
Senior Advisor for Research Policy DC CA ES
Program Manager for the Fuel Cell Technologies DC -- ES
DOE: Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology DC NA ES
Deputy Director, Office of Climate Chnage Policy and Technology. DC NA ES
DOE: Office of General Counsel
Deputy General Counsel, Technology Transfer and Procurement DC CA ES
Deputy General Counsel, Technology Transfer and Procurement DC CA ES
Assistant General Counsel, Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property DC CA ES
Department of Health Resource and Human Resources: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology
National Health Information Technology Coordinator DC NA ES
Principal Deputy National Coordinator DC NA ES
Special Assistant DC SC GS
Chief Privacy Officer DC NA ES
Director, office of Health Information Technology Adoption DC -- ES
DOHAHS: Office of the Assistant Secretary of Financial Resoures
Principal Deputy Assitant Secretary, Resources and Technology DC CA ES
DOHAHS: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Information Technology Chief Information Officer DC CA ES
DOHAHS: Office of Management
Director, Office of Information Technology Shared Services, Office of Management DC -- ES
Director, Information Technology Systems DC -- ES
Director, Information Technology Infrastructure DC -- ES
DOHAHS: Health Resources and Services Administration Office of the Administrator
Director, Office of Information Technoloy and Chief Information Officer DC CA ES
Associate Administrator, Healthcare Systems Bureau. DC CA ES
DOHAHS: Center for Information Technology
Deputy Director DC CA ES
Assistant Director for Policy and Public Affairs DC -- ES
DOHAHS: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Director, Information Technology DC CA ES
DOHAHS: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration
"Deputy Assistant Secretary, Information
Technology/Chief Information Officer" DC CA ES
Department of Homeland Security: Office of General Counsel
Associate General Counsel for Technology Programs DC -- ES
DOHS: Office of the Under Secretary for National Protection and Programs Directorate
"Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and
Telecommunications." DC NA ES
Deputy Under Secretary, Cybersecurity DC NA ES
Chief Technology Officer . DC CA ES
Program Analyst - Cybersecurity Strategist DC SC GS
Cybersecurtiy Strategist DC SC GS
"Office of the National Coordinator for Health
Information Technology "
Chief Privacy Officer DC NA ES
Director, Office of Health Information Technology Adoption DC -- ES
Director, Office of Policy and Research DC CA ES
National Health Information Technology Coordinator. DC NA ES
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Financial Resources
Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Resources and Technology. DC CA ES
DOHS: Office of the General Counsel
Associate General Counsel for Technology Programs. DC -- ES
DOHS: Office of the Under Secretary for National Protection and Programs Directorate
Director, United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (USVISIT) Program. DC CA ES
Chief Technology Officer DC CA ES
Program Analyst - Cybersecurity Strategist DC SC GS
Senior Advisor for Public Affairs . DC SC GS
Cybersecurity Strategist DC SC GS
DOHS: Office of the Under Secretary For Science and Technology
Chief of Staff DC -- ES
Special Assistant to the Under Secretary DC CA ES
Director, Administration and Support Division DC CA ES
Chief Systems Engineer DC CA ES
Director, Research and Development Partnerships. DC CA ES
Department of Housing and Urban Development: Office of the Chief Information Officer
Deputy Chief Information Officer DC CA ES
Deputy Chief Information Officer for Information Technology Operations. DC CA ES
Deputy Chief Information Officer for Cyber Security and Privacy Information. DC CA ES
Chief Information Technology Transformation Officer DC TA ES
Chief Architect for Information Technology DC -- ES
DOHAUD: Office of the Chief Procurement Officer
Chief Procurement Officer . DC CA ES
" Deputy Chief Procurement Officer for Policy,
Risk Management and Administration" DC -- ES
Associate Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition Workload, Planning, Management Oversight DC -- ES
Department of the Interior: Assistant Secretary - Policy, Management and Budget
Deputy Chief Information Officer DC CA ES
Deputy Assistant Secretary - Technology, Information and Business Services. DC NA ES
Associate Deputy Chief Information Officer DC CA ES
Deputy Chief Information Officer - Shared Services. DC CA ES
DOI: National Business Center
Assistant Director, Information Resources DC TA ES
DOJ: Office of the Associate Attorney General
" Chief, Networks and Technology Enforcement
Section." DC CA ES
Department of State: Office of Innovation and Technology
Senior Advisor to the Secretary on Innovation DC NA ES
Special Assistant DC SC GS
Staff Assistant DC SC GS
DOS: Office of the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Digital Media DC SC GS

Department of Transportation: Chief Information Officer
Chief Information Officer . DC NA ES
Associate Chief Information Officer for IT Policy Oversight DC -- ES
Associate Chief Information Officer for Information Technology Shared Services DC CA ES
Associate Director for IT Strategy and Technology Projects DC SC GS
DOT: Research, Development and Technology
Associate Administrator DC CA ES
Director, Office of Infrastructure Research, Development and Technology DC CA ES
Director, Office of Operations Research, Development and Technology McLean, VA CA ES
Director, Office of Corporate Research, Technology and Innovation Management DC CA ES
DOT: Field Services
Director of Technical Services Lakewood, CO CA ES
"DOT: Research, Technology and Information
Management and Chief Information Officer "
Associate Administrator DC CA ES
Director, Office of Analysis Research and Technology DC CA ES
DOT: Research and Innovative Technology Administration
Administrator DC PAS EX
Deputy Administrator DC NA ES
Director, Office of Governmental, International and Public Affairs DC SC GS
DOT: Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
Deputy Associate Administrator for Research, Innovation and Technology DC CA ES
Director, Center for Safety Management Systems DC -- ES
Department of the Treasury: Office of the Under Secretar for Domestic Finance
Project Manager, Information Technology Consolidation Kansas City, MO TA ES
Department of Veterans Affairs: office of the Assistant Secretary for Information and Technology
Assistant Secretary DC PAS EX
Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary DC CA ES
Assistant Deputy Chief Information Officer for Project Management. DC CA ES
Executive Director (Field Operations) Vancouver, WA CA ES
Executive Director (Systems Engineering) New York, NY CA ES
Deputy Chief Information Officer for Product Development DC CA ES
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Security DC CA ES
Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy, Privacy and Incident Management DC CA ES
Deputy Chief Information Officer for Architecture, Strategy, and Design DC CA ES
Deputy Director DC CA ES
Assistant Deputy Chief Information Officer for Enterprise Development Software Engineering DC CA ES
Assistant Deputy Chief Information Officer for Enterprise Development Software Development DC CA ES
Assistant Deputy Chief Information Officer for Product Management DC CA ES
Deputy Chief Information Officer DC -- ES
Program Management Officer DC TA ES
EPA: Office of Information Collection
Director DC CA ES
Deputy Director DC CA ES
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: Office of the Chair
Senior Advisor (Information Technology) DC EX
Commissioner DC PAS EX
EEOC: Office of Information Technology
Chief Information Officer DC CA ES
Federal Communications Commission: Office of Engineering and Technology
Chief DC CA ES
Deputy Chief DC CA ES
General Services Administration: Office of Citizen Services and Innovation Technologies
Senior Advisor for Information Technology DC CA ES
Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board
Infromation Technology Specialist DC XS AD
Social Security Administration: Office of Communications Planning and Technology
Associate Commissioner DC -- ES
SSA: Office of Telecommunications and Systems Operations
Assistant Associate Commissioner for Enterprise Information Technology Operations and Security DC -- ES
Agency for International Development: Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance
Program Manager (Tech Conflict Advisor) DC XS AD
Agency for International Development: Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture and Trade
Director, Office of Infrastucture and Engineering DC -- OT
Director, Office of Economic Growth DC CA OT
Director, Office of Policy, Information, Communications and Outreach DC CA OT
Executive Office of the President: Office of Informaiton and Regulatory Affairs
Senior Technical Analyst DC CA ES
Special Assistant to the President and Director of Digital Strategy DC PA AD
Department of Commerce: Office of Public Affairs
Director of Digital Strategy DC SC GS
Department of Energy: Office of Public Affairs
Senior Advisor and Director of New Media DC SC GS
Director, User Experience and Digital Technologies DC SC GS
Senior Digital Communications Strategist DC SC GS
New Media Specialist DC SC GS
Corporation for National and Community Service: Office of External Affairs
Director of Digital Media DC XS OT