Tuesday, July 16, 2024

GRAUN WARNS BRITAIN OF BRISK NEW CLIMATE RISK

Storm Ciarán’s low pressure 

made tea taste worse, say scientists

Thursday, July 11, 2024

WINES THAT PAIR WELL WITH POLAR BEAR PATE'

In  Mark Steyn's delusional view, Europe's regional "medieval warm period " was hot enough for Vikings  to make to make wine in Greenland.

He has dismissed  global warming as a hoax on the grounds that vines no longer grew as far north as the Medieval vineyards of England's Eli cathedral. 

Except that they do. Steyn's reflexive denial of the consequences of the Industrial Revolution has made him the laughing stock of British winemakers

Thanks to the amplification of global warming by long summer days at high latitudes, wine making has in recent decades marched north clear through Northumbria  and Scotland to the Outer Hebrides!

Not to be outdone, the Viking's descendants are now making wine in Telemark, a Norwegian region better known for inventing skis than growing fruit

Here's a tasting of recent vintages from the Danish border to the edge of the Arctic Circle:

Wednesday, July 10, 2024

TUCKER CARLSON'S FIRST DAY IN CLIMATE SCHOOL

Sanctioned Russian oligarch and Putin pal Andrey Melinchenko has  inadvertently imposed sanity on Tucker and his fans by  giving him a long , lucid and clearly unexpected lecture on climate science and realpolitik 

The noted Trump University drop-out's last science tutor  was  Fred Singer protege turned  John Birch Society summer camp instructor  Willie Soon:

Tuesday, July 9, 2024

CLIMATE WITCH HUNT ENDS IN WITCH ARREST

In UNrelated news, Senator James inhofe
DIED SUDDENLY TODAY

MALE (AFP) — Police in the Maldives have arrested a state environment minister, officers said Thursday, with media in the Indian Ocean nation reporting she was accused of performing “black magic” on the president.

State Minister for Environment, Climate Change and Energy, Fathimath Shamnaz Ali Saleem, was arrested on Sunday along with two others in the capital Male, police said.

She has been remanded in custody for a week pending investigations, officers added, without giving details for her arrest.

“There have been reports that Shamnaz was arrested for performing black magic on President Dr. Mohamed Muizzu,” said the Sun, a local media outlet.

Police would neither confirm nor deny the report.

Her position is an important job in a nation on the frontlines of the climate crisis, with United Nations environment experts warning rising seas could make it virtually uninhabitable by the end of the century.


Sunday, July 7, 2024

        WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF -EVIDENT

WHAT WE DO

We have assembled world-class researchers, labs, thought leaders, and practitioners to translate research about misinformation and disinformation into policy, technology design, curriculum development, and public engagement…. Our nonpartisan Center brings together diverse voices from across industry, government, nonprofits, other institutions, as well as those from communities and populations typically underrepresented in research and practice in this field.


SCIENCE ADVANCES        VOL. 7, NO. 23

CONSERVATIVES’ SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLITICAL MISPERCEPTIONS

R. KELLY GARRETT HTTPS://ORCID.ORG/0000-0001-7022-7452 AND ROBERT M. BONDAuthors Info & Affiliations

 Jun 2021      DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abf1234

Abstract

The idea that U.S. conservatives are uniquely likely to hold misperceptions is widespread but has not been systematically assessed. 

Research has focused on beliefs about narrow sets of claims never intended to capture the richness of the political information environment. Furthermore, factors contributing to this performance gap remain unclear. We generated an unique longitudinal dataset combining social media engagement data and a 12-wave panel study of Americans’ political knowledge about high-profile news over 6 months. 

Results confirm that conservatives have lower sensitivity than liberals, performing worse at distinguishing truths and falsehoods. 

This is partially explained by the fact that the most widely shared falsehoods tend to promote conservative positions, while corresponding truths typically favor liberals.

 The problem is exacerbated by liberals’ tendency to experience bigger improvements in sensitivity than conservatives as the proportion of partisan news increases. These results underscore the importance of reducing the supply of right-leaning misinformation. 


Meanwhile , The Kennedy School,Misinformation Review checked to see how well 150 of its contributors represented the American electorate, and discovered this distinctly sinister  distribution  :



Thursday, July 4, 2024

HOUTHI GREENS SEQUESTER SHIPLOAD OF COAL IN RED SEA

                 SOFT COAL CARRIER HIT by HARDLINE Houthi DRONE & MISSILE attack

JUNE 18 CENTCOM report SAYS  : "An uncrewed Houthi surface vehicle struck the Liberian-flagged, Greek-owned and operated merchant vessel Tutor in the Red Sea. The strike resulted in damage to the engine room."



Хуситы затопили судно с российским углем

Wednesday, July 3, 2024

             COMING SOON TO THE COVER OF VANITY FAIR

 WHILE CLIMATE SCIENCE REMAINS IN


                               AND HAS BECOME INCREASINGLY
CLIMATE POLICY HAS  NOT FARED AS WELL,
AND  BECOME  LAMENTABLY






Sunday, June 23, 2024

GREEK CLIMATE CRISIS ENTERS THIRD MILLENNIUM

Lewis Lapham  has retired to Rome but Lapham's  Quarterly  reminds us that now, as when the word "history"  was coined in Aesop's time, not much is new under the sun:









"In his HistoriesHerodotus tells how the ancient Greeks and the Egyptians each thought the other was poised to become climate victims. 

When Herodotus traveled to Egypt to conduct field interviews for his research, he wanted to know everything about the Nile: how much water it contained, how much the sun evaporated that water, and what its seasonal rhythms were. That the Nile blithely irrigated vast portions of the delta without the need for the Egyptian farmers to do anything filled him with civilizational envy. 

————————————————————————

    ******************************      ACCORDING TO LEGEND



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

But Herodotus predicted that the Egyptians would be in trouble when the delta collected too much sediment and reached an incline that made it no longer so easily irrigable. Then the Egyptians “will suffer for all remaining time,” he wrote. During an interview he conducted with a Nile River clerk, he discovered Egyptians felt the same way about him. 

They pitied the Greeks because they were more dependent on rainfall for their crops. 

“If the god shall not send them rain,” Herodotus wrote, channeling his native informant, “but shall allow drought to prevail for a long time, the Hellenes will be destroyed by hunger; for they have in fact no other supply of water to save them except from Zeus alone.” 

The losers of this game of environmental chance would start appearing as climate refugees at the winners’ doorstep, ready to worship new gods.

Thomas Meaney is a fellow at the Max Planck Society at Göttingen. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, the London Review of Books, the Guardian, and elsewhere.

CLIMATE OF HYPE: (MAYBE IT ISN'T JUST ME?)

HYPE KILLS YOUR STORY 

The use of hyperbole in scientific literature is increasing, undermining effective scientific communication.

All science writing courses emphasize that a manuscript should tell a story. But why is that? After all, a scientific finding remains true regardless of the final write-up. Discoveries are made in the laboratory, but the scientific method is much more than han- dling equipment with dexterity and carrying out a well-designed experiment. A pillar of the scientific method, as formulated in the seven- teenth century, is to report findings so others can repeat them. Only then do they become part of human knowledge — a literature.

All important pieces of knowledge in the history of humankind have been transmitted down through stories (orally or written). As the 2017 Nobel laureate in Literature Kazuo Ishiguro put it1: 

“For me, the essential thing is that stories communicate feelings. That they appeal to what we share as human beings across our borders and divides.” 

We would argue that a scientific paper too should communicate feelings. And what better subject to cut across borders and divides than science! A paper is pleasing to read when the reader can feel a sense of amazement with the sci- ence presented, when the beauty of nature, the simplicity of an idea or the elegance of an experiment become self-evident.

Communicating feelings does not mean recounting a full day of work, or the emotions one went through while purifying a challenging sample or during that particularly productive day in the lab, although a rich description of such circumstances were the norm in the past — consider for example how Gilbert Stokes reports the discovery of the homonymous shift in the fluorescence of quinine solutions in 1852. At some point in his 100-page paper, he voices frustration that: 

“Want of sunlight [not an abundant commodity in Cambridge, England] proved to be such an impediment to the pursuit of these researches that I was induced to try some bright flames, with the view of obtaining some convenient substitute.”

Nowadays, a paper must be concise and to the point. Communicating feelings means letting the reader experience the same moment of epiphany the authors did when everything suddenly made sense, taking the reader by the hand to the newly discovered land. In science, this is usually done by interlinking data, photographs, and models in a logical manner. Atoms, photons, vibrational states and quasi-particles are the characters. In other types of literature, writers use different tools to generate images in their readers’ brains (metaphors in poetry, for instance). But like for other literature, the idea is to create a compelling and engaging picture in the mind of the reader, who will then be able to follow your reasoning and description (the ‘show, don’t tell’ predicate).

Hyperbolic statements, such as “this work represents a breakthrough/paradigm shift/ groundbreaking/unprecedented result, opens up new avenues of investigation, is the Holy Grail, and so on”, kill the pleasure of reading, because they undermine the whole construct3. 

They contribute nothing to the building of that mental image and instead impose the authors’ opinions upon the reader with brute force. Those expressions already create apprehension in the reader. Sadly, studies have shown that hyped expressions per paper published have doubled in the past 50 years, especially in the hard sciences, probably because academic findings in these disciplines tend to lack immediate real-world implications4,5. If authors feel the urge to add these statements, they should ask themselves

whether there is a better, quantitative argument that can be made instead. Doing so will result in more compelling prose.

As editors, we strive to offer to our readers the best scientific studies we receive. If a manuscript tries too hard to convince us, we feel a sense of nausea. On the contrary, a good paper brings us joy. 

Believe it or not, we can sense the excitement for the science when we read manuscripts; and so will the reader. When we come across this kind of manuscript, we get a rush of excitement; we cannot wait to let our readers know all about it. That is when we know a manuscript has a story to tell, a story that is likely to hit the imagination of the reader, and that can be inspirational. 

Paraphrasing the Editor-in-Chief of Nature, Magdalena Skipper, we would like our papers to read like a page-turner of a book. It’s literature after all.

Published online: 18 June 2024

References

1. Ishiguro,K.MyTwentiethCenturyEvening—andOther Small Breakthroughs (The Nobel Foundation, 2017); https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/2017/ ishiguro/lecture/

2. Stokes,G.G.Philos.Trans.R.Soc.London142, 463–562 (1852).

3. Halford,B.Chem.Eng.News87,34(2009).

4. Hyland, K. & Jiang, F. J. Pragm. 182, 189–202 (2021). 5. Vinkers,C.H.etal.BMJ351,h6467(2015).

6. Thielking,M.MeetNature’sneweditor:ageneticist

who reads scientific papers like ‘page turners’ STAT

(4 May 2018); https://www.statnews.com/2018/05/04/ nature-editor-in-chief-magdalena-skipper/

Friday, June 21, 2024

             MAR A LAGO : THE SANDWRITING ON THE WALL

Governor DeSantis ban on using the words 'climate change' in naming state programs didn't stop Florida from spending a hundred million dollars shoring up the servant's entrance to Mar A Lago.

CLIMATE ADAPTATION FLORIDA STYLE

While the Florida Department of Transportation can't call it a climate adaptation project, the improvements along Southern Boulevard are intended to keep traffic and pedestrian flow across the tidal Lake Worth Lagoon high and dry in the face of a very climatey problem: continuing sea level rise along both Mar-a-Lago's lagoon bulkhead & Atlantic sea wall.



LAST APRIL 13th, AS TWO FEET OF RAIN SWAMPED SOUTH FLORIDA, PRESIDENT TRUMP SAT IN MAR A LAGO DOING A FAIR IMITATION OF KING CANUTE, TELLING PAST FLOODING VICTIM TUCKER CARLSON  NOT TO WORRY  "ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING... THE OCEAN WILL RISE IN THE NEXT 300 YEARS BY 1/8TH OF AN INCH"
 The reality is that sea level is rising a hundred times faster than Trump told Carlson. It has risen more than an eighth of an inch since this interview was taped. At this rate, the Venetian ballroom of Mrs. Post's Italianate palazzo will become gondola-accessible by this century's end .

The barrier island's coral rock spine may survive, but absent heroic engineering, low-lying Mar A Lago will not. 

The Flagler Museum and the Breakers Hotel have better prospects for survival. Both rise from the  Coquina bedrock of the Anastasia formation,  created during the Pleistocene era when sea level was lower, and sand & shells were exposed to slightly acidic rainwater, that dissolved enough of their calcium carbonate to glue them  together  into rock. 

Palm Beach has long presented a surfing challenge, for many iron bulkheads were emplaced in its fragile shore in the 1920's to curb sand migration and beach erosion. Jutting out  tens of yards from the low water mark, they punctuate the coast with a fossil map of the beachfront property lines of the Roaring Twenties. Their rusting remains  still pose a danger, and Palm Beach lifeguards, public and private, restrict swimming to roped-in beaches when the water turns rough.

Until Trump appeared on the scene, this made then-empty Mar A Lago's unguarded Atlantic beach a neighborhood short-board Mecca when surf was up. 
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