Sunday, October 22, 2017

HE USED TO SWIM WITH SHARKS, NOW HE JUST JUMPS THEM


Thanks to Breitbart's vigilant  fact-checkers,  the pesky things rarely outcrop in the work of: 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

      THE  POLITICAL  ENTOMOLOGY   OF  CLIMATE CHANGE

The nondescript Venezuelan Poodle Moth            The  Flannel Moth pussy caterpillar, Megalopyge opercularis 
The  probable  failure of  some of  President Trump's  EPA and DOE nominees to secure  confirmation  by the Senate raises an interesting structural civics question: once an adminstration runs out of nominees from the bottom of the  pork barrel where can it turn  for yet more political cannon fodder?

The answer may  be that Capitol Hill time-servers seldom reject nominees who strongly resemble those in high office, which in President Trump's  case, makes for a very short list/
It can only be extended beyond Alec Baldwin by turning to the biodiversity of tropical wetlands beyond the fever swamps of the Potomac.

Besides its uncanny phenotypic resemblence to Vice President Pence, the Venezuelan  Poodle  Moth is easily captured, as it is irresistably drawn to tiki torches. As is a MAGA  hat-worthy Megalopygid called the Flannel Moth  Pussy Caterpillar which is the spitting image of our  Chief Executive's hair :


Both  of  these  tropical species  are  marching North  towards the District of Columbia in lock step with rising global temperatures, and may be expected to follow in the footsteps of the prickly pear cacti that colonized NewYork Harbor in the 1950's. Once there, they will soon be enfranchised to vote for Mayor de Blasio like all the other immigrants before them. It but remains for the Senate to prepare for that contingency by appointing these remarkable creatures as Acting Deputy Assistant Undersecretaries  before their relatives arrive.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

               CLIMATE OF FEAR AT THE NEW YORK TIMES

This Hot Lead Type Headlined The New York Times

Raymond_henry_1_2The ghastly shootings in Las Vegas  have  driven New York Times  columnist Bret Stephens to op-ed overkill in calling for the repeal of the Second Amendment of the Constitution:

"The idea that an armed citizenry is the ultimate check on the ambitions and encroachments of government power is curious," he writes. "The Whiskey Rebellion of the 1790s, the New York draft riots of 1863, the coal miners' rebellion of 1921, the Brink's robbery of 1981—does any serious conservative think of these as great moments in Second Amendment activism?"

While Stephens freedom of opinion is guaranteed by the First Amendment, he has no right to  rewrite the  Times own history. A century and a half  ago, the paper  reported on the  Civil War Draft Riots raging on its doorstep even as the none too distant thunder of  Confederate guns was heard in Washington D.C.
Reader response to the  Times Editorial Page peaked in 1864, when a gun-toting mob set out to lynch the Editor, for  a reason some present subscribers might approbate: Henry J. Raymond was Chairman of the Republican National Committee.

It did not signify that the Times  supported Abe Lincoln. What made the mob howl was bloodthirsty editorials by  competitors like Horace Greeley of The New Yorker. But when armed thugs marched up Broadway to sack the New-York Times offices, they found the Editor  waiting for them. 

Having  stood  beside  Yankee  General  McClellan  on  the battlefields of Virginia, Henry Raymond was quite prepared to defend the freedom of the press in New York.
Gat1865_2New-York Times Editor Raymond put himself on the firing line by deploying a brace of Gatling guns, one in the newsroom window, and another in the front entrance, " commanding Park Row to the north," and the fully automatic weapons' debut well and truly detered the gangs of New York.
When Raymond died in 1867, the paper went to press "in full mourning"  with a front page edged in black.  It is sad to see a newsroom where the Second Amendment insured the defense of the First in 1864 plead the Fifth when called upon to remember its own history.